Saturday, August 8, 2015

All Gone

There is a harsh truism in farming - don't get attached to anything that lives at the bottom of the food chain. 

I was woken up this morning by the sound of a coyote barking just outside my window.  It is not unusual to hear them, but they generally don't come so close to the house.  I yelled at them and Connor barked his meanest, loudest bark (he really is the most ferocious sounding dog I've ever had), but it did no good.  The Freaky Five are all gone.

I found all that was left in the back pasture, just outside of the fence where the donkeys can't reach.  I haven't been letting the herd in there because they can't have so much grass. 

I was worried about having poultry up here and had sort of been expecting to lose at least one or two, I counted them every time I saw them.  I was hoping that guineas, who are supposed to be so flighty, elusive, and good at protecting themselve would be safe.  I never thought all five of them would get eaten in a single night.  I was wrong on all counts, which is depressing and frustrating on so many levels.

Goodbye little freaks, I am sorry I couldn't keep you safe and I hope that whatever dimension you exist in now is a good one, without coyotes.  


I am done trying to raise poultry up here on this miserably inhospitable hill.  I kept telling myself not to get attached to the guineas because no good could come of it.  I failed at that as well.





21 comments:

  1. No no no no no!!! Not all five, that is just horrible and sad and depressing. And scary - how is it even possible that not a single guinea managed to escape?! I am very sorry you are having to go through this, Kris.

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  2. oh I am so sorry. I would be upset as well.

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  3. I'm just catching up here. OH NO!
    Eventually my chickens were taken by raccoons and I know how you feel. We have discussed a varmint proof hen house in the future. Even with that, it can be risky.
    I'm so sorry for the loss of the FF. Even I was attached to them through your blog.
    We raised these many years ago and they provided us with daily year round antics...

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  4. Crap! It sure seemed like a good idea. I'm sorry Kris…it's easy to fall for the goofy ones.xxoo

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  5. What a devastating loss! You are right -- it's a sad fact that we lose farm animals no matter how hard we try to protect them. Don't blame yourself.

    They're wacky and noisy, but once you have them, you value them for the job they do and wonder at them for the insane behavior at times.

    I've got only 4 guineas at the moment, and I started out with 12 half-grown ones. They sleep in the rafters of the barn at night (pooping on the donkeys' backs). One female nested in the barn and something got her (her 39 eggs were due to hatch in another week) -- a terrible loss, especially since I had the trap all set just in case something came into the barn.

    I love having guineas around but it's always a crapshoot. So sorry to read your post today.

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  6. Its strange they were outside during the night. I thought they would be inside their "coop." So, sorry.

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  7. So sorry for the sad news.

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  8. I am sad to hear your guineas are gone. I enjoyed seeing them so much.

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  9. Doggonit! I'm so sorry to hear it. Having captured all 5 of your guineas, I'm guessing there was more than one coyote. Too bad guineas won't go up at night like chickens. :(

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  10. I'm sorry to hear that. I'd have thought for sure they would have been roosting in trees or able to fly up in order to avoid the coyotes.

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  11. We just ordered our first guinea's for the new farm. We have been so enjoying your posts about the FF. The big tobacco barn is going to house our livestock. I have to admit things do not always go well with keeping livestock in this world! May they cause a big bang in their dimension!

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  12. Ah, nuts. Kris, I'm sorry. From one who has lost three flocks to mink and foxes, I know just how difficult it is to keep our feathered friends safe, and how heartbreaking it is when we can't. Chin up, my friend ❤

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  13. Although I'm not a guinea fan (the neighbor's group seemed dumb as mud to me) I am saddened at all deaths. Said neighbor had about 12 for a couple of years and like Gale's, they roosted on the loft of the barn. In two nights, 10 disappeared. We found feathers in our pasture.

    Knock on wood we have made our coop and chicken pen critter proof.

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  14. Stupid coyotes :-(. Is your cat safe?

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  15. Oh bummer but poultry of any sorts does bring the predators in - even around here where there are more and more houses. Sorry about your birds...:(

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  16. I am so sorry... I am going through it here, too... so you are not alone.

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  17. Oh my God, I'm so sorry! That is so sad, we lost all of our chickens to hawks and coyotes.

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  18. Ohhh, so sorry about your Freaky Five. I do try not to get fond of the little beasties but it isn't easy. I get fond of my chooks (chickens) though I try not to. And, why is it that it's always the tamest and/or funniest one that cops whatever is going to happen? I've never lost my whole flock in one go, though. Devastating!

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  19. Oh, I'm so sorry for your loss. It is hard to not get attached.

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  20. Oh how sad to lose them ALL! Poor dumb things. I, too, would have thought they'd roost in trees and be safe from furry predators. (Owls are another story). I'm sorry.

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